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neuroscience

Link Between Alzheimer’s Disease and Gut Microbiota Is Confirmed

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia. Still incurable, it directly affects nearly one million people in Europe, and indirectly millions of family members as well as society as a whole. In recent years, the scientific community has... Continue Reading →

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline

We may wish some memories could last a lifetime, but many physical and emotional factors can negatively impact our ability to retain information throughout life. A new study published in the journal Psychological Science found that people who feel enthusiastic and cheerful... Continue Reading →

Study helps explain why motivation to learn declines with age

As people age, they often lose their motivation to learn new things or engage in everyday activities. In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have now identified a brain circuit that is critical for maintaining this kind of motivation. This... Continue Reading →

Humans are born with brains ‘prewired’ to see words

Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of... Continue Reading →

Parkinson’s disease is not one, but two diseases

Although the name may suggest otherwise, Parkinson's disease is not one but two diseases, starting either in the brain or in the intestines. Which explains why patients with Parkinson's describe widely differing symptoms, and points towards personalised medicine as the... Continue Reading →

Female chromosomes offer resilience to Alzheimer’s

Women with Alzheimer's live longer than men with the disease, and scientists at UC San Francisco now have evidence from research in both humans and mice that this is because they have genetic protection from the ravages of the disease.... Continue Reading →

Got fatigue? Study further pinpoints brain regions that may control it

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine using MRI scans and computer modeling say they have further pinpointed areas of the human brain that regulate efforts to deal with fatigue. The findings, they say, could advance the development of behavioral and other... Continue Reading →

‘Little brain’ or cerebellum not so little after all

When we say someone has a quick mind, it may be in part thanks to our expanded cerebellum that distinguishes human brains from those of macaque monkeys, for example. Sometimes referred to by its Latin translation as the '"little brain"',... Continue Reading →

Why some words may be more memorable than others

Thousands of words, big and small, are crammed inside our memory banks just waiting to be swiftly withdrawn and strung into sentences. In a recent study of epilepsy patients and healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our... Continue Reading →

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