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neuroscience

MRI reveals brain damage in obese teens

Researchers using MRI have found signs of damage that may be related to inflammation in the brains of obese adolescents, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).... Continue Reading →

Specific neurons that map memories now identified in the human brain

An important aspect of human memory is our ability to conjure specific moments from the vast array of experiences that have occurred in any given setting. For example, if asked to recommend a tourist itinerary for a city you have... Continue Reading →

Link between inflammation and mental sluggishness shown in new study

Scientists at the University of Birmingham in collaboration with the University of Amsterdam have uncovered a possible explanation for the mental sluggishness that often accompanies illness. An estimated 12M UK citizens have a chronic medical condition, and many of them... Continue Reading →

Screen-based media associated with structural differences in brains of young children

A new study documents structural differences in the brains of preschool-age children related to screen-based media use. The study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, shows that children who have more screen time have lower structural integrity of white matter tracts in parts... Continue Reading →

Why music makes us feel, according to AI

In a new paper, a team of USC computer scientists and psychologists teamed up to investigate how music affects how you act, feel and think Your heart beats faster, palms sweat and part of your brain called the Heschl's gyrus... Continue Reading →

Are we ‘brainwashed’ during sleep?

New research from Boston University suggests that tonight while you sleep, something amazing will happen within your brain. Your neurons will go quiet. A few seconds later, blood will flow out of your head. Then, a watery liquid called cerebrospinal... Continue Reading →

Why, sometimes, we don’t see what we actually saw

Georgetown University neuroscientists say they have identified how people can have a "crash in visual processing" -- a bottleneck of feed-forward and feedback signals that can cause us not to be consciously aware of stimuli that our brain recognized. In... Continue Reading →

Autism spectrum disorder risk linked to insufficient placental steroid

A study in experimental models suggests that allopregnanolone, one of many hormones produced by the placenta during pregnancy, is so essential to normal fetal brain development that when provision of that hormone decreases or stops abruptly - as occurs with... Continue Reading →

Metabolic disturbance in the brain exacerbates, may forewarn Alzheimer’s pathology

A better understanding of the metabolic processes in the brain -- specifically disturbances resulting from neurodegenerative diseases -- has important implications for potential treatments. The research was presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and... Continue Reading →

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