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Scents of Science

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Nanotubes in the eye that help us see

A new mechanism of blood redistribution that is essential for the proper functioning of the adult retina has just been discovered in vivo by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM). Their study was published in Nature. "For... Continue Reading →

Candy-Colored Phobos

As of March 2020, our Mars Odyssey spacecraft has captured these six views of the Martian moon Phobos. The orbiter's infrared camera, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), is used to measure temperature variations that provide insight into the physical properties and... Continue Reading →

NGC 6814: Grand Design Spiral Galaxy from Hubble

In the center of this serene stellar swirl is likely a harrowing black-hole beast. The surrounding swirl sweeps around billions of stars which are highlighted by the brightest and bluest. The breadth and beauty of the display give the swirl... Continue Reading →

‘Black dwarf supernova’: Physicist calculates when the last supernova ever will happen

The end of the universe as we know it will not come with a bang. Most stars will very, very slowly fizzle as their temperatures fade to zero. "It will be a bit of a sad, lonely, cold place," said... Continue Reading →

Past evidence supports complete loss of Arctic sea-ice by 2035

A new study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, supports predictions that the Arctic could be free of sea ice by 2035. High temperatures in the Arctic during the last interglacial -- the warm period around 127,000 years ago --... Continue Reading →

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?

In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in... Continue Reading →

Mystery solved: Bright areas on Ceres come from salty water below

NASA's Dawn spacecraft gave scientists extraordinary close-up views of the dwarf planet Ceres, which lies in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. By the time the mission ended in October 2018, the orbiter had dipped to less than... Continue Reading →

Ancient part of immune system may underpin severe COVID

One of the immune system's oldest branches, called complement, may be influencing the severity of COVID disease, according to a new study from researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Among other findings linking complement to COVID, the researchers found... Continue Reading →

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers, researchers say

A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on... Continue Reading →

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