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medicine

How old are your organs? To scientists’ surprise, organs are a mix of young and old cells

Scientists once thought that neurons, or possibly heart cells, were the oldest cells in the body. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered that the mouse brain, liver and pancreas contain populations of cells and proteins with extremely long lifespans --... Continue Reading →

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Coffee not as bad for heart and circulatory system as previously thought

Drinking coffee might keep us up at night, but new research has given us a reason to sleep easy knowing that the popular drink isn't as bad for our arteries as some previous studies would suggest. The research from Queen... Continue Reading →

Older fathers put health of partners, unborn children at risk

Men who delay starting a family have a ticking "biological clock" -- just like women -- that may affect the health of their partners and children, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, which reviewed 40 years of research on the... Continue Reading →

New approach to managing surgery will speed patient recovery but challenges current practices

A review in CMAJ challenges historical surgical practices that are not research-based, outlining a multidisciplinary approach called enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) that will help patients recover more quickly from surgery. The article, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), reviews... Continue Reading →

A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing

New research led by scientists at Newcastle University, UK reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness - by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body. The team... Continue Reading →

People can survive organ failure, a review explores how

Although organ failure can be fatal, your kidneys, heart, and liver are prepared for this catastrophe. Emerging research supports the finding that two cell populations quickly respond and work together to restore a non-functioning, or failing, organ. First, the surviving... Continue Reading →

New chemical probes advance search for new antibiotics

Indiana University researchers are advancing knowledge about how bacteria build their cell walls that could contribute to the search for new antibacterial drugs. They have created a new tool to observe living cells in real time under a microscope. "If... Continue Reading →

Study links protein, clusterin, to cardiac and metabolic diseases

During a study spanning nearly a decade, researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute and Houston Methodist Cancer Center have linked the protein clusterin - for the first time -- to many different facets... Continue Reading →

“Sull’ aneurisma”

Anatomical drawing: showing ligaments and muscles of left side of face and (extended) arm. By Antonio Scarpa, 1804.

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